"The Home of the Free Because of the Brave "
PARADE HONOREES

 

 

 

Grand Marshal
of
the 2014 Laguna Beach Parade
2014 Grand Marshal Olympic Champion Janet Evans

2014 GRAND MARSHAL
2014 Grand Marshal Olympic Champion Janet Evans

2014 Grand Marshal Olympic Champion Janet Evans The parade is honored to have one of Laguna's own Olympic champions as our Grand Marshal this year. Janet Beth Evans set numerous world records in swimming and won gold medals in two different Olympic Games in 1988 and 1992. Born in Fullerton in 1971, she began swimming in competitions as a small girl. After graduating from El Dorado High School in Placentia and winning three gold medals in the 1988 Seoul Olympics, Janet was competing at Stanford when she decided to devote herself full-time to her sport. This involved extraordinarily rigorous training in order to develop remarkable cardiovascular endurance that allowed her to become the world's fastest female swimmer in long distance events from 400 to 1,500 meters. Despite her relatively small size, she used a distinctive windmill swimming technique in combination with her high level of fitness to routinely defeat larger, more muscular swimmers, some of whom were later discovered to be using performance-enhancing drugs. She was so dominant in her events that her various world records in the 400-, 800-, and 1,500 meter freestyle stood for an astonishing eighteen to twenty years. Janet has been awarded many honors in her career including the James Sullivan Award as top American amateur athlete and being named three times as Female Swimmer of the Year by Swimming World Magazine. In the eyes of many Americans, perhaps her most moving honor took place during the 1996 Olympic Games at Atlanta when she was selected to hand the Olympic Torch to Muhammad Ali to light the cauldron in the spectacular opening ceremonies. In 1994, Janet was still competing internationally when she graduated from the University of Southern California with a degree in communications. Subsequently, she has used her academic skills and built upon her athletic achievements to become a popular motivational speaker as well as a spokesperson for a number of major corporations. Janet married Bill Willson in 2004, and the couple later settled in Laguna Beach where they are raising their two children. In between, it has come as no surprise to most that several years ago Janet returned to competitive swimming and even tried out for the 2012 Olympics at the age of 40. Today she still happily follows that passion swimming in Laguna Beach.

Cover artist Camden Benson, Musical Artist Carol C. Reynolds, Honored Patriot Robert R. Mosier, Junior Citizen of the Year Garrett Burk,  Citizen of the Year Wayne Baglin,  Athletes of the Year Alisa Schwarzstein Cairns, Ian Cairns, Essay Winner Charlie Hoffs, Junior Citizen of the Year Perry Nielson

 

The 2014 Laguna Beach Parade
Honored Patriot of the Year

Robert R. Mosier, U.S. Army Air Force, World War II

photo to come

2014 HONORED PATRIOT OF THE YEAR
Robert R. Mosier, U.S. Army Air Force, World War II

During the Second World War, virtually every adult American was involved in the war effort in some way. In March of 1943, our Honored Patriot, Bob Mosier, enlisted in the Army Air Force at the age of eighteen after graduating from Marshall High School in Hollywood. The war then was not going well for the U.S. and the Allies. In particular, there was a tremendous loss of pilots and airmen in the skies over Europe and the Pacific. Bob had grown up in southern California which then abounded in aviation activity, and as he underwent training as a private at the huge USAAF base at what is now the Orange County Fair Grounds, he set his sights on becoming a pilot. Under existing policies, he was not qualified to apply, but as pilot losses mounted, he got his chance to become an aviation cadet. He went rapidly through pilot training and was still a teenager when he received his pilot wings and commission in 1944 in Douglas, Arizona. Despite his young age, he underwent specialized training and served as an advanced multi-engine flight instructor for some months. Later that year, Second Lieutenant Mosier was ordered to Nadzab, New Guinea in the southwest Pacific where he joined the 57th Troop Carrier Squadron, then part of the Fifth Air Force. He was given cursory training in the Douglas C-47 transport and after a few flights as a co-pilot, became a twenty year-old aircraft commander flying a variety of hazardous missions including dropping paratroopers into combat, assault glider towing, and medical evacuations from combat zones. Rough field conditions and few navigation aids beyond dead reckoning made flying the C-47, and later the much larger Curtiss C-46, challenging; on one occasion, inexperienced ground personnel overloaded so much steel planking into his aircraft that he barely was able to get it airborne. On some nights on Pelelieu in the Caroline Islands, Bob and his crew would be sleeping under the wings when suicide attackers rushed the airstrip. During the liberation of the Philippines, he often had to fly low and directly over the ground fighting. One of his more satisfying missions there involved dropping paratroopers who captured a strip of highway near the Santo Tomas prison camp. He and his squadronmates then landed on the road amid sniper fire to fly liberated prisoners of war to safety. He was on Okinawa when a sudden outpouring of friendly fire announced the end of the war in August 1945. He flew a group of officers to the small island of Ie Jima to meet Japanese peace envoys who had flown there in white-painted aircraft. Soon after, he flew one of the first aircraft to land on the Japanese mainland at Atsugi near Tokyo. Later missions involved flying Allied prisoners who had survived forced labor from their former camps to ports for their return home. Once, when bad weather forced him to divert to a Japanese bomber base with ex-POWs on board, he was surprised to see the base's personnel attempting to surrender to him. In addition to campaign medals for his wartime service, Bob was also personally decorated with three Air Medals. Returning home, Bob was about to begin studying electrical engineering at UCLA on the GI Bill when his sister introduced him to an attractive co-worker named Beverly Christiansen. Three months later they married. The couple has four children, fourteen grandchildren including an Air Force test pilot, and fourteen great-grandchildren. At Berkeley while finishing his degree, Bob was on a team that built the first digital computer in 1949-50. That machine is now in the Smithsonian. Impressed with the quality of his communication and navigation gear during the war, he sought and won a job with its manufacturer, Collins Radio, eventually becoming its vice-president for engineering. Bob was key in the 1950s revolutionary development of modems that allowed data transmissions between computers over a single communication channel. He oversaw many other projects over a long career that took a turn when Collins opened up its western division in Newport Beach. Bob and Bev then discovered Laguna Beach and have enjoyed being part of the community ever since 1970. This year they will celebrate 68 years of marriage together with their family and friends.

The 2014 Laguna Beach Parade
Honored Citizen of the Year

Wayne Baglin

photo to come

2014 HONORED CITIZEN
Wayne Baglin

The Citizen of the Year Award is given to persons who have contributed significantly on behalf of the community. Three-time former Mayor Wayne Baglin was born in 1943 and graduated from Glendale High School. He attended Glendale College, Louisiana State University, and received his degree in political science from Cal State Northridge in 1965. While still at Glendale College, he met his future wife, Faye Palmer. In January 1966, Wayne volunteered and successfully completed the Coast Guard's Officer Candidate School. He was commissioned and married Faye. The next day, the newlyweds drove off in her Ford Falcon to his first duty assignment as junior officer on a cutter, the USCGC Blackthorn, home-ported at Mobile, Alabama.

That year, Wayne spent months at sea resetting buoys blown away by hurricanes from the Florida panhandle to the coast of Yucatán. In 1968 he was assigned to the Rescue Coordination Center in San Juan, Puerto Rico when an overloaded tanker, Ocean Eagle, grounded in heavy swells and broke up while coming into San Juan's harbor. It was the first major oil spill on U.S. shores, and Lt(jg) Baglin was directly involved in the nation's first on-water clean-up using new techniques of recovering and dispersing crude oil. The disaster deeply impressed on him the importance of preventing coastal pollution. Wayne left the Coast Guard as a lieutenant.

After his release from the service, Wayne began working for Fluor, the global engineering and construction firm. Both he and Faye had enjoyed visiting Laguna in the 1950s and 60s, and so in 1969, they decided to make their home here. Living in a cottage near the old Ford's Café, one day Wayne noticed machinery on a nearby beach moving sand from a public area onto private property. He spoke about this in front of city council and realized that citizen participation could make a positive difference in the community. Wayne ran and lost his first two attempts for a council seat, but in 1975 he was appointed to the board of the Laguna Beach County Water District and helped oversee a large but unglamorous capital project of overhauling the district's aging pipes. His service there gave him insight into the importance of simply getting the job done to ensure having a proper infrastructure outside of the political arena. He later volunteered to serve on the Parking, Transportation, and Circulation Committee that advised the city.

In 1978 he was elected to the city council along with Kelly Boyd. Two years later, he became mayor for the first time. With much development taking place in south Orange County, the council was then facing the challenging reality of our town changing from a self-reliant community of artists and visitors into more of a bedroom community. Over his years as mayor and councilmember, his personal goal was to preserve the fabric of what makes Laguna a special place. Key to this was the hiring of Ken Frank as city manager who would effectively carry out this vision over the next three decades.

In the 1980s he took a hiatus from volunteer public service when work took him and his family— now with daughter Whitney and son Flynn—to Saudi Arabia. Upon returning, he shifted careers into real estate while Faye resumed hers as a paralegal. He established a local, boutique real estate office, was elected president of the Laguna Board of Realtors, and became active in the community again. In 1994, he was re-elected to the city council and served another four years. Around the same time, he was appointed to the State of California Water Quality Control Board and was its chair for three years. Under his leadership—and no doubt prompted by his love of scuba diving and body-surfing— the board focused on aggressively correcting sewer spills that were polluting coastal waters not only around Laguna but as far south as the Mexican border. The City of San Diego proclaimed April 2, 2002 to be "Wayne Baglin Day" for his pursuit for clean ocean waters.

Wayne has served as a board director on the Friends of Harbors, Beaches and Parks, South Orange County Wastewater Authority, Orange County Coastal Greenbelt Authority, Laguna Canyon Foundation and years ago the fledgling Laguna Club for Girls. A longtime member and enthusiastic supporter of the Festival of Arts, Wayne has served as a director since 2005 and was president of the board of directors for three years. He has served as chair of the Laguna Beach Alliance for the Arts for two years and continues on the board. Today he reflects that one of the joys of public service and living in this community has been its wide diversity of personalities. We salute Wayne Baglin for his decades of dedication in keeping Laguna Beach "a very special place" for all of us.


The 2014 Laguna Beach Parade
Artist of the Year

Carol C. Reynolds

photo to come

2014 HONORED ARTIST OF THE YEAR

Carol C. Reynolds

Although Laguna Beach may be renowned for its visual artists, musical artistry also abounds. This year we honor Carol Reynolds for her role as both a teacher and in bringing large ensemble music to our community. She was born in Philadelphia and grew up in northern New Jersey where she developed a passion for music at an early age. She studied the French horn for two years at the Juilliard School of Music in New York City, and while a senior in high school, played first chair horn in the New Jersey All State Band. She continued her music studies at the University of Michigan and then launched into teaching for the next thirty-five years, most of them in Yorba Linda. Moving to Laguna, she soon was heavily involved in volunteer activities, first on the Arts Commission in 1992 and serving as its chair in 2000. In 1998, Carol along with Teresa Marino and Bill Nicholls started the Community Band with a total of six musicians. Fifteen years later, the band has 65 members, three conductors, two jazz bands, and a flute ensemble of 24 members from throughout Orange County who perform in venues from our city streets to Segerstrom Hall. The band was honored to be chosen to play original music at the dedication of Crystal Cove Amphitheater this February. The indefatigable Carol also serves on the Laguna Beach Live music festival board, the San Juan Mariachi board, and the Sister City Board. She is a member of the Pacific Symphony Guild, a past-president of the American Association of University Women, and served on the Youth Shelter Board. She volunteers wherever she is needed musically, from playing piano for the Woman's Club to the AAUW and more recently at a breakfast for the homeless. We say: "Brava, Carol!"

The 2014 Laguna Beach Parade
Athletes of the Year
Alisa Schwarzstein Cairns and Ian Cairns, World Surfing Champions


photo to come

2014 HONORED ATHLETES OF THE YEAR
Alisa Schwarzstein Cairns and Ian Cairns, World Surfing Champions

Not long after the Beach Boys immortalized Laguna in their 1963 song "Surfin' USA," a young girl in our town was growing up with a passion for that sport. Alisa Schwarzstein was still a sophomore at LBHS when she won the 1980 World Amateur Surfing Championship in Biarritz, France on the Bay of Biscay. This early victory set her desire to compete and be the best in the sport. While still studying for her degree in sociology at UCLA, she turned professional and spent the next ten years on the Association of Surfing Professionals World Tour. Alisa was U.S. Champion in 1995 and 1996. More recently, she was a member of the gold-medal winning team at the U.S. Masters in 2012. She currently coaches the LBHS surfing team and continues to compete happily in our own Brooks Street Classic, which she has won some eight times, most recently in 2013.

Australian Ian Cairns is a world-famous big wave surfer from Perth who founded the Association of Surfing Professionals in 1983. He began surfing in 1965 and eventually won six State of Western Australia titles. Waves on the Indian Ocean in southwest Australia tend to be large and gave Ian the experience to tackle spots like Hawaii's North Shore. Joining his national surfing team, he won the World Professional Championship in 1973, the first of six major world tour titles that included surfing thirty-foot monsters at Waimea Bay in the Duke Kahanamoku Invitational of 1975. In 1982, he founded the Op Pro Surfing Championship sponsored by Ocean Pacific sportswear and later, the U.S. Open of Surfing in Huntington Beach. Today, Ian coaches surfing and the relatively new form of the sport of stand-up paddle surfing as well as designing boards for Ozo Boards and King's Paddlesport.

Back in the early 1980s, Alisa had been a member of the U.S. National Surfing Team when it was being coached by Ian. Time passed and in the 1990s the pair grew close on the pro tour. Alisa and Ian married and now are proud parents of twin boys, Ethan and Malachai, who are students at Thurston Middle School. In 2012 Alisa was inducted as Woman of the Year at the Surfing Walk of Fame in Huntington Beach. There she joined Ian on the same Walk where he had been honored two years previously. They have been the only couple ever to be so honored. We salute our iconic world champion surfing couple!


The 2014 Laguna Beach Parade
Junior Citizens of the Year

Laguna Beach High School Seniors
Perry Nielson and Garrett Burk

photos to come

2014 HONORED JUNIOR CITIZENS OF THE YEAR
Perry Nielson and Garrett Burk

The Junior Citizens are members of the Laguna Beach High School Class of 2014 and are selected by the faculty and staff in recognition of their leadership and accomplishments in academics, athletics, and community service. Perry Nielson's family moved to Laguna just before her freshman year. Having lived in several other states, she set as a personal goal reaching out to others which she has done as president of the Circle of Friends that helps special education students integrate into the student body. An academic all-star with a 4.4 grade point average, Perry also tutors math after school. She has been a four-year cross-country runner and was selected as "Most Inspirational" because of her encouragement to the youngest runners on the team. In community service, she volunteers at our homeless shelter and participates in an innovative program at the Boys and Girls Club by mentoring the same group of kids as they progress from kindergarten into the early grades of elementary school. On a recent service trip to India, she worked at a school in a leper colony. Perry hopes to attend Brigham Young University and become a math education teacher.

Garrett Burk grew up in Laguna Beach. A superior student, he carries a 4.6 grade point average and excels in math and economics. He has played baseball all four years and is expected to be this year's starting third baseman. As reflected in his service activities, Garrett has been particularly concerned about drug and alcohol use by young people. He currently is a leader in the Laguna Prescription Drug Awareness Group. He is also vice-president of the Catalyst Club, which promotes sober student activities on weekends. As only a sophomore, he received the Daughters of the American Revolution Good Citizenship Award for LBHS. The following year, he was sponsored by American Legion Post 222 to attend Boys State in Sacramento. In 2013, he was flown to New York as the sole high school student in the nation to be awarded the Major League Baseball Commissioner's Play Healthy Award created to combat illegal drug use in all levels of sports. Garrett hopes to attend Harvard or Georgetown to study social entrepreneurship, which is aimed at forming businesses that create social profits as well as financial ones.

 

COVER ARTIST: 



ESSAY WINNER: 
Charlie Hoffs is a 8th grader at Thurston Middle School
and a member of Ms. Laura Silver's Language Arts class.

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Last updated February 1, 2014